Press Release

Computer History Museum Receives Grant From The National Historical Publications and Records Commission

Mountain View, California  |  July 12, 2018

Computer History Museum (CHM), the world's leading institution exploring the history of computing and its ongoing impact on the human experience, today announced that it is a recipient of a 2018 Access to Historical Records: Archival Projects award from the National Archives’ National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC).

The Museum was awarded $99,528 to process and make publicly available twelve of its collections documenting the history of software and its ongoing impact on the human experience. Grant funds will be used to hire one full-time archivist for eighteen months who will utilize the help of CHM volunteers to make this material publicly available as quickly and efficiently as possible. The Museum’s project was one of 13 projects selected from a pool of 39 applicants.

The 400 linear feet of text and software in CHM’s Software History Processing Project (SHiPP) document the transforming uses of, technological advances in, and creation of, software. Not only through the executable code and digital files we all envision when someone says “software,” but also through the personal papers of pioneering software makers, and the records of companies that designed and marketed software products.

The National Archives’ National Historical Publications and Records Commission was established by Congress in 1934 and supports a wide range of activities to preserve, publish, and encourage the use of documentary sources, relating to the history of the United States.

About the Computer History Museum

The Computer History Museum (CHM) in Mountain View, California, is a nonprofit organization with a four-decade history as the world's leading institution exploring history of computing and its impact on the human experience. The Museum is home to the largest international collection of computing artifacts in the world, encompassing computer hardware, software, documentation, ephemera, photographs, and moving images. The Museum brings computer history to life through large-scale exhibits, an acclaimed speaker series, a dynamic website, docent-led tours, and an award-winning education program. For more information and updates, visit www.computerhistory.org.

PRESS CONTACTS:

Carina Sweet
csweet@computerhistory.org
(650) 810-1059

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